Albrecht Dürer:
Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt
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Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt
Albrecht Dürer:
Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt

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Reproduktion, Aquarell auf Chagall Insize Papier | Massivholzrahmung | verglast | Format 30 x 24 cm (H/B)

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Product no. IN-732437.R1

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Frame variant
Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt
Albrecht Dürer: Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt

Detailed description

Bild "Junger Feldhase" (1502), gerahmt

We're sorry, but there is no English translation for this item yet. If you are interested in the size or the material of this product, please have a look at the German description as stated below.

Albrecht Dürers genauer Blick auf die Tierwelt: Dürer zählt zu den bedeutendsten und vielseitigsten Künstlern der Zeit des Übergangs vom Spätmittelalter zur Renaissance in Deutschland. Gerade seine Tierzeichnungen weisen auf den von Mythologie und Aberglaube unverstellten Blick auf die Natur voraus, der für die Renaissance so kennzeichnend wurde - sie sind an Genauigkeit in Beobachtung und zeichnerischer Ausführung kaum zu übertreffen.

"Junger Feldhase" (1502): Dieses Aquarell gehört zu den bekanntesten Tierstudien Dürers. Das Original befindet sich in der Grafischen Sammlung Albertina, Wien.

Aquarell auf Chagall Insize Papier reproduziert, in anspruchsvoller Massivholzrahmung, verglast. Format 30 x 24 cm (H/B).

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Portrait of the artist Albrecht Dürer

About Albrecht Dürer

1471-1528

German painter, copperplate engraver and woodcut draughtsman. He is one of the most important and versatile artists of the period of transition from the late Middle Ages to the Renaissance in Germany.

At first, he learned goldsmithing but at the age of fifteen, he already started as an apprentice to a painter. Later he followed the German custom of taking Wanderjahre (gap years), and when he returned home he developed the greatest versatility in painting using the techniques known at the time.

His animal drawings, that are produced in such accuracy of observation and execution of drawing, point to the view of nature, undistorted by mythology and superstition, that became so characteristic of the Renaissance. The statement formulated by Galileo more than a century later already applied to Dürer at his time: "Nature is written in that great book whichever is before our eyes but we cannot understand it if we do not first learn the language and grasp the symbols in which it is written."

At first, he learned goldsmithing but at the age of fifteen, he already started as an apprentice to a painter. Later he followed the German custom of taking Wanderjahre (gap years), and when he returned home he developed the greatest versatility in painting using the techniques known at the time.

His animal drawings, that are produced in such accuracy of observation and execution of drawing, point to the view of nature, undistorted by mythology and superstition, that became so characteristic of the Renaissance. The statement formulated by Galileo more than a century later already applied to Dürer at his time: "Nature is written in that great book whichever is before our eyes but we cannot understand it if we do not first learn the language and grasp the symbols in which it is written."

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