Sabine Wild:
Picture "New York II" (2007)
Proportional view
Picture "New York II" (2007)
Sabine Wild:
Picture "New York II" (2007)

Quick info

limited, 6 copies in total | photo laminated behind acrylic | size 93 x 140 cm (h/w)

incl. tax plus shipping

Product no. IN-880701

Delivery time: approx. 2 weeks

Picture "New York II" (2007)
Sabine Wild: Picture "New York II" (2007)

Detailed description

Picture "New York II" (2007)

Sabine Wild's work shows her very own perspective on the architecture of metropolises, such as New York City. The photograph is only the beginning because afterwards, Wild digitally edits the photo, blurs the contours, varies the colours and adds vertical and horizontal stripes and lines. The digital editing creates the impression of the buildings being disassembled into individual parts - and yet the typical character of the motif is never lost.

Photo laminated behind acrylic, 2007. Limited edition 5 copies + 1 A.P. copy. Size 93 x 140 cm (h/w).

Portrait of the artist Sabine Wild

About Sabine Wild

Sabine Wild was born in 1962 in Padua, Italy, and graduated from different German universities such as Bielefeld, Münster, Cologne and Berlin with a Master of Arts. She is a photographer par excellence. A connoisseur of her oeuvre describes her as following: "What Sabine Wild develops concerning formal solutions and impressionistic resolutions, dematerialisations and plays of light, is decorative in the best sense. Sabine Wild is in the process of creating a new art movement, closely related to photography but charged with the strengths of painting."

Between reality and fiction: Sabine Wild presents with her works her very own perspectives on, for example, the architecture of metropolises such as New York, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Berlin or Dubai. A photograph is always just the beginning for her fascinating city portraits because Wild then digitally modifies the photos, blurs the contours, varies the colours and adds vertical and horizontal stripes and lines. The digital editing almost makes it seem as if the buildings have been disassembled into individual parts – and yet she never loses the typical character of the motifs.

Recommendations